40 Inspirational Albert Einstein Quotes on Science and Education

 

Albert Einstein was a German physicist, known for his theory of relativity and major influence on the philosophy of science and modern physics. Here are some of his most inspirational quotes about science:

 

Quotes on Science and Education: 

1. The scientist find his rewards in what Henri Poincaré calls the joy of comprehension, and not in the possibilities of application to which any discovery may lead.

2. Concern for man and his fate must always form the chief objective of all technological endeavours… in order that the creations of our minds shall be a blessing and not a curse to mankind. Never forget this in the midst of your diagrams and equations.

3. Why does this magnificent applied science which saves work and makes life easier bring us so little happiness? The simple answer runs: Because we have not yet learned to make sensible use of it.

4. The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking.

5. When I have no special problem to occupy my mind, I love to reconstruct proofs of mathematical and physical theorems that have long been known to me. There is no goal in this, merely an opportunity to indulge in the pleasant occupation of thinking.

6. The progress of science presupposes the possibility of unrestricted communications of all results and judgements– freedom of expression and instruction in all realms of intellectual endeavour.

7. In science, moreover, the work of the individual is so bound up with that of his scientific predecessors and contemporaries that it appears almost as an impersonal product of his generation.

8. Equations are more important to me, because politics is for the present, but an equation is something for eternity.

9. I have deep faith that the principle of the universe will be beautiful and simple.

10. My scientific work is motivated by an irresistible longing to understand the secrets of nature and by no other feelings. My love for justice and the striving to contribute towards the improvement of human conditions are quite independent from my scientific interests.

11. Space by itself, and time by itself, are doomed to fade away into mere shadows, and only a kind union of the two will preserve an independent reality.

12. I never failed in mathematics. Before I was fifteen I had mastered differential and integral calculus.

13. Everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that some spirit is manifest in the laws of the universe, one that is vastly superior to that of man. In this way the pursuit of science leads to a religious feeling of a special sort, which is surely quite different from the religiosity of someone more naive.

14. The real goal of my research has always been the simplification and unification of the system of theoretical physics.

15. The grand aim of all science is to cover the greatest number of empirical facts by logical deduction from the smallest number of hypotheses or axioms.

16. It is the theory that decides what can be observed.

17. Yes, we have to divide up our time like that, between our politics and our equations. But to me our equations are far more important, for politics are only a matter of present concern. A mathematical equation stands forever.

18. This world is a strange madhouse. Currently, every coachman and every waiter is debating whether relativity theory is correct.

19. The process of scientific discovery is, in effect, a continual flight from wonder.

20. Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe.

21. Young people especially like to contemplate bold projects. Also, it is natural for a serious young man to envision his desired goals with the greatest possible precision.

22. The gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge.

23. We will hope that future historians will explain the morbid symptoms of present day society as the childhood ailments of an aspiring humanity, due entirely to the excessive speed at which civilisation was advancing.

24. The search for truth is more precious than its possession.

25. The most valuable thing a teacher can impart to children is not knowledge and understanding per se but a longing for knowledge and understanding, and an appreciation for intellectual values, whether they be artistic, scientific, or moral.

26. I believe, indeed, that overemphasis on the purely intellectual attitude, often directed solely to the practical and factual, in our education, has led directly to the impairment of ethical values.

27. The only source of knowledge is experience.

28. Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.

29. When I was a little boy my father showed me a small compass, and the enormous impression that it made on me certainly played a role in my life.

30. Studying, and striving for truth and beauty in general, is a sphere in which we are allowed to be children throughout life.

31. The only thing that you absolutely have to know, is the location of the library.

32. (On education) The point is to develop the childlike inclination for play and the childlike desire for recognition and to guide the child over to important fields for society; it is that education which in the main is founded upon the desire for successful activity and acknowledgement.

33. Never regard your study as a duty, but as the enviable opportunity to learn the liberating beauty of the intellect for your own personal joy and for the profit of the community to which your later work will belong.

34. I do not much believe in education. Each man ought to be his own model, however frightful that may be.

35. Numerous are the academic chairs, but rare are wise and noble teachers. Numerous and large are the lecture halls, but far from numerous the young people who genuinely thirst for truth and justice.

36. The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when one contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvellous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries to comprehend only a little of this mystery every day.

37. Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school.

38. Most people say that is it is the intellect which makes a great scientist. They are wrong: it is character.

39. Today also there is an urge toward social progress, toward tolerance and freedom of thought, toward a larger political unity… But the students at our universities have ceased as completely as their teachers to embody the hopes and ideals of the people.

40. IT IS THE SUPREME ART OF THE TEACHER TO AWAKEN JOY IN CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND KNOWLEDGE.

 

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